Wool: The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing

Crunchy leaves, shorter days and colder temperatures conjure up images of cozy sweaters, fuzzy mittens and being bundled in scarves. Unfortunately, many of the items that keep us warm are made with wool, a fiber taken from animals such as sheep, goats and rabbits.

Little Ellie at Cedar Row Farm Sanctuary
Little Ellie at Cedar Row Farm Sanctuary

People often question why wool isn’t cruelty free, seeing as that the fiber is removed from the animal via shearing or mulesing, which doesn’t kill the animal. However, mulesing removes both the wool and the skin and shearing often results in everything from cuts to accidental amputations. Luckily for those wishing to live a cruelty-free life, there are plenty of alternatives available to keep you toasty!

Modal

This natural synthetic is made from beech trees and absorbs 50% more water than cotton, making modal a great choice for hikers. Modal is also referred to as the artificial silk, as it is similar in its soft texture but doesn’t require ironing and keeps its shape.

Bamboo

Made from a renewable resource, bamboo is comparable to cashmere and silk in texture but also is biodegradable and reportedly stronger than merino wool and doesn’t hold scents.

Bamboo forest

Hemp

Hemp is not only cruelty-free but can easily be grown without pesticides and has a deep root system, allowing for easy organic farming that helps to create a strong soil system.

Tencel

Also known as lyocell, this material made from wood pulp can replicate wool, silk, leather or suede. As a bonus, tencel is biodegradable and production of it uses less energy and water than many conventional fabrics.

With so many alternatives to wool, there’s plenty of ways to stay cozy and cruelty-free in the chilly weather!

Cruelty-Free Fabric Guide 

Quickly cross-reference clothing tags with our pocket Cruelty-Free Fabric Guide (free with purchase) featuring some of the most common clothing fabrics and our comprehensive list of vegan and non-vegan fabrics 

Compassionate Closet Cruelty-Free Fabric Guide


Stephanie Boyd
Stephanie Boyd

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